Hoop Size Selection Guide

What size hoop should I choose?

What size hoop to use is a much debated and highly personal subject. In my opinion most people start with too small of hoops to easily learn on body skills, which has definitely played a factor in the current stylistic trend for mostly off body hooping. If you are just starting out, and you want to hoop for fitness or just really want a good on body foundation, a general rule is the larger your waist circumference, the larger the hoop you will need. A good average size is 38 - 42 inches OD in the 7/8 tubing (see chart below). When it comes to off-body, the length of between your palm and the center of your chest should be perfect. Smaller and lighter is key, so if that is your "thing" go for a hoop in the 3/4 tubing. It is very common for hoopers to have hoops in multiple sizes (for years!) while building their foundation. Over time you may find a happy "medium", mine (after 20 years) is a 3/4 EcoHoop in 34.5 inches (see chart below).

Here are some average guidelines for choosing your hoop size (see both charts).

Beginner/Core Hoop size guide:

Waist Circumference (in inches)

Hoop Size range (in inches OD)

The average range for a beginner or on-body hoop size, is between 38 inches and 45 inches OD. As a general rule, Increase the size of the hoop if you are very uncoordinated or decrease if you are a dancer, athlete or yogi.

26 - 28

38 - 39

29 - 31

39 - 40

32 - 34

40 - 41

35 - 37

41 - 42

38 - 40

42 - 43

 

 

 

Perfect all purpose, on and off body hoop (once you have learned your on body movements and are ready to size down).

Waist measurement (in inches)

Hoop Size (in inches, OD) These are an average based on the beginner size hoop for your waist size and your off body hoop size (determined by measuring your arm to middle of chest length). Go up or down a few inches depending on stylistic preference. Larger for more on body and smaller for more off body. 

26 - 28

31.5 -32.5

32.5 – 33.5

33.5 – 34.5

34.5- 35.5

35.5- 36.5

36.5- 37.5

37.5 – 38.5

29 - 31

32 – 33

33 – 34

34 - 35

35 - 36

36 - 37

37 - 38

38-39

32 - 34

32.5 – 33.5

33.5 – 34.5

34.5 -35.5

35.5 – 36.5

36.5- 37.5

37.5 – 38.5

38.5 – 39.5

35 - 37

33 – 34

34 - 35

35 - 36

36 - 37

37 - 38

38 - 39

39 - 40

38 - 40

33.5-34.5

34.5 - 35.5

35.5 – 36.5

36.5-37.5

37.5 – 38.5

38.5 – 39.5

39.5 – 40.5

Arm Length; from palm of hand to middle of chest (in inches)

25/26

27/28

29/30

31/32

32/33

34/35

36/37

    Other factors to hoop size selection:

    Stylistic preference~

    Hoop Dance has grown large enough that there are many different styles within the larger label of "Hoop Dance". From popular off body tech styles like fast breaks, continuous wedgies and body rolls to the roots of the modern art of Hoop Dance, Body Rocking. Body Rocking is characterized by an emphasis on DANCE with the hoop most often on the core. Of course it is also possible to be an almost even 50/50 between on and off body. If you have a perference for off body you will likely be in the smaller range of hoops and prefer lighter tubing such as 5/8 or 3/4 HDPE or Poly. If you are a Body Rocker you may prefer hoops just an inch or two larger. 
     
    Feel~
    Feel is the biggest grey area in the subject of hoop size. It is totally subjective and un provable. I have heard both HDPE and POLY described as "springy" and heard both types of tubing also described as "rigid". So it is really up to your body and what it likes. Weight is also a totally personal preference. Some people prefer (mostly men) the weight of a heavy hoop, no matter how advanced they get. While others love the feel of something feather light. There are some generalities though. If you prefer core hooping, you will probably also prefer a hoop slightly heavier and larger (Poly and HDPE are popular for core hoopers) than those that prefer mostly off body (HDPE and Poly are preferred by off body hoopers). This is a simple matter of physics. For off body, you want something light that your wrist and hand can easily move through space without too much resistance, for on body, you want to be able to feel the hoop on your body for better control. Ultimately though, let YOUR body tell you what feels good!
    Athletic Ability/Coordination~ 
    Hooping is an athletic activity. Doesn't mean you have to be an athlete to do it, but if you are already fit you will have an easier time (in general) than someone who loves to sit on their couch all day. Also, if you are the type of person that regularly trips over their own feet, you may have a little more challenging time at first than someone who is already, say, juggling.. or just good at catching things when they fall off the counter. 
    Again, the charts above are general guidelines. I hope that it helps you along your journey! Also, I am so intrigued to hear your experience and feedback on this! Please contact me here!